CLF 2012 Newsletter Fall2 - page 1

Cutaneous Lymphoma Foundation: Making sure each person with cutaneous lymphoma gets the best care possible
Nurses – Front Line Soldiers in the Fight Against
Cutaneous Lymphoma
“Marianne Tawa” – Continued on Page
7
Cutaneous Lymphoma Foundation
PO Box 374
Birmingham, MI 48012-0374
telephone: (248) 644-9014
fax: (248) 644-9014
email:
Forum
is published by the
Cutaneous Lymphoma Foundation.
Disclaimer
The Cutaneous Lymphoma Foundation does
not endorse any drugs, treatments or products
reported in this newsletter. Information is pro-
vided for informational purposes only. Because
the symptoms and severity of cutaneous lym-
phoma vary among individuals, the Cutaneous
Lymphoma Foundation recommends that all
drugs and treatments be discussed with the
reader’s physician(s) for proper evaluation, treat-
ment and medical care.
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
From the President and the Chief
Executive Officer . ............................ 2
Cutaneous Lymphoma Patient
Educational Opportunities .............. 4
My Personal Journey:
Francesca R. Giancotti, PhD ........... 5
Insurance: Know Your Policy........... 6
My Personal Journey:
Andrew Lotz ...................................... 8
A Caregiver’s Story: It’s My Journey
Too
Meredith Wallace ............................. 9
Toast & Jam
Andrew McDiamid ............................ 9
Advocacy in Action Summaries .....10
Medical Meetings Recap................11
Cutaneous Lymphoma Foundation’s
Annual Fund Campaign.................... 12
A Year in Review - What Your
Donations Have Accomplished......13
EORTC - Cutaneous Lymphoma Task
Force Annual Meeting ....................14
Fall 2012
Nurse
Practitioner,
Dermatology
and Cutaneous
Oncology
Dana Farber
Cancer
Institute, Boston
Massachusetts
Forum
utaneous Ly pho a Foundation: Making sure each person with cutaneous ly pho a gets the best care pos ible
Marianne C. Tawa RN, MSN, ANP Danica Uzelac RN, BSN
Clinical
Research
Coordinator
Photopheresis
Clinician
Department of
Dermatology
Rush University
Medical Center
Marianne Tawa has cared for patients with
cutaneous lymphomas for more than 12
years. She is an enthusiastic member of a
multi-disciplinary care team at Dana Farber
Cancer Center in Boston, focusing on the
management of cutaneous lymphoma. As
a Nurse Practitioner, Ms. Tawa is well
positioned to work with a team that includes
dermatologists, oncologists, radiation
oncologists and other professionals.
She is a “collaborator,” but also has
responsibilities independent from the
team. As an advanced practice clinician,
she is educated and licensed to conduct
independent patient visits, with attention to
patient assessment, symptom management,
medication prescribing, and supportive care.
The stage of a patient’s disease typically
dictates whether the Nurse Practitioner will
collaborate with a dermatologist or medical
oncologist.
In addition to clinical and technical
expertise, the nursing role allows
for management of critical patient
communication and provision of
psychosocial support. Ms. Tawa assists
patients with (as she terms it) the “settling
in” phase that accompanies a new cancer
diagnosis. She provides them with strategies
to reduce unnecessary fear and anxiety.
Although she has been with Rush for
over twenty years, Ms. Uzelac’s work in
cutaneous lymphoma is relatively recent.
Back in 2002 she jumped at an opportunity
to learn photopheresis – a therapy that
offered hope without the side effects of
traditional chemotherapy. In time she
moved into the Dermatology Department
and the rest, as they say, is history.
The cutaneous lymphoma clinic at Rush
University Medical Center works as a
team with a variety of medical, surgical,
oncology, pathology, and radiation oncology
specialties. Ms. Uzelac feels privileged to
work under the leadership of Michael Tharp,
MD, Professor of Dermatology and Warren
Piette, MD, Professor of Dermatology and
Director of the clinic. These are brilliant
physicians with vision and caring for the
patients and families they serve.
The members of the Rush University
Medical Center cutaneous lymphoma clinic,
take pride in the personal care for each
patient – getting to know their history and
understanding their disease.
The most difficult work, albeit very
rewarding, is helping support the very
small percentage of patients whose disease
progresses. The vast majority of patients
Nurses play a critical role in patient care and treatment, especially in cutaneous
lymphoma where patients may see nurses more often throughout their course of
treatment. The CLF had the chance to catch up with two very dedicated clinicians and
talk with them about their work in the world of cutaneous lymphoma.
“Dani Uzelac” – Continued on Page
7
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